Satellite

The Road To Magnasanti

EPFC | May 22nd, 2018

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
guest curator: LJ Frezza

Just as all movies end, we will all end, and even this planet will end. What will come after is unknowable. But before all that, I’ll be posting videos that address progress, eschatology, and other terminal points.

This week, we’ll continue to explore the end, and in particular, the end of New York, with THE ROAD TO MAGNASANTI. Named for the most perfect game of Sim City ever played, in which all urban space was optimized for maximum population density, THE ROAD TO MAGNASANTI shows an old city is demolished to make room for luxury developments. Through a collage of wandering street-videography and a rambling yet insightful voice-over, director John Wilson explores hyper-gentrification, the police state, and the comedic absurdity of the city, questioning why the old New York has to end and just who this New New York is being built for.

THE ROAD TO MAGNASANTI (John Wilson, 2017)
https://vimeo.com/238073511

Marvelous Movie Mondays: Portrait of Turner

EPFC | April 30th, 2018

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
guest curator: Kiki Loveday

April showers bring QUEER REPRODUCTION.

A significant body of contemporary feminist work explores questions of adaptation, reiteration, and change through formal, temporal, and aesthetic means. Queer and feminist makers are re-writing the historical narrative while pushing the boundaries of multiple mediums. From Laleen Jayamanne’s A Song of Ceylon, Cecelia Condit’s Oh, Rapunzel, and Midi Onodera’s Ten Cents a Dance, to Elisabeth Subrin’s Shulie, Jennifer Montgomery’s Deliver, Amy Ruhl’s How Mata Hari Lost Her Head and Found Her Body, and Pauline Boudry/Renate Lorenz’s Salomania, to Ja’tovia Gary’s An Ecstatic Experience, Christina Corfield’s Petticoat Nation, Kate Lain’s friskies paté (for joyce wieland) and Irene Lusztig’s Yours in Sisterhood— these makers masterfully reiterate, reinscribe, and reimagine the past in order to transform the present. Every Monday this month I will post a video exploring this growing body of work that queerly questions the possibilities of re-production in the digital age.

Irene Gustafson’s 2009 55 minute video Portrait of Turner re-stages Shirley Clark’s challenging 1967 classic Portrait of Jason. In Gustafson’s experiment, her camera is turned upon performance artist Scott Turner Schofield, raising a series of questions about the nature of performance, experiment, and repetition. This obscure gem formally connects contemporary queer video practice to feminist film histories, insisting on comparison and re-vision that demands continued debate.

Enjoy!

https://vimeo.com/102774623

 

Marvelous Movie Mondays: QUEER REPRODUCTION

EPFC | April 18th, 2018

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
guest curator: Kiki Loveday

April showers bring QUEER REPRODUCTION.

A significant body of contemporary feminist work explores questions of adaptation, reiteration, and change through formal, temporal, and aesthetic means. Queer and feminist makers are re-writing the historical narrative while pushing the boundaries of multiple mediums. From Laleen Jayamanne’s A Song of Ceylon, Cecelia Condit’s Oh, Rapunzel, and Midi Onodera’s Ten Cents a Dance, to Elisabeth Subrin’s Shulie, Jennifer Montgomery’s Deliver, Amy Ruhl’s How Mata Hari Lost Her Head and Found Her Body, and Pauline Boudry/Renate Lorenz’s Salomania, to Ja’tovia Gary’s An Ecstatic Experience, Christina Corfield’s Petticoat Nation, Kate Lain’s friskies paté (for joyce wieland) and Irene Lusztig’s Yours in Sisterhood— these makers masterfully reiterate, reinscribe, and reimagine the past in order to transform the present. Every Monday this month I will post a video exploring this growing body of work that queerly questions the possibilities of re-production in the digital age.

Since her award-winning debut with How Mata Hari Lost Her Head and Found Her Body in 2011, Amy Ruhl has been developing an important body of work that returns persistently to feminist sites/cites in past popular cultures. Ruhl uses the phrase “radical reproduction” to describe this element of her oeuvre which includes a playful research-based practice and deep engagement with feminist film theory. Her ongoing multidisciplinary performance project, Between Tin Men, includes her trademark tropes of authorial self-inscription, mesmerizing visual effects, and feminist camp.
Enjoy!

https://vimeo.com/253139302

Marvelous Movie Mondays: Unruly Women

EPFC | March 10th, 2018

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!
Guest Curator: Jennifer Reeder

Theme for March: UNRULY WOMEN

In real life and in fiction, I deeply appreciate an unruly woman. A woman who lives and thrives on her own terms and whose own internal power is lawless, feral even. Sometimes these women are called bitches which of course is just a way to dismiss their inherent agency. For all the Monday’s in March, I will post short narrative films directed by women about women (or girls) who are actualizing their audacity.

BONESHAKER by Frances Bodomo

https://vimeo.com/183085974

Green Ray

EPFC | February 26th, 2018

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
Guest Curator: Nellie Kluz

Like “Moonstruck,” this week’s film is concerned with celestial bodies – lunar, solar, tomayto, tomahto – and the way they act upon humans. “Green Ray” is a 2001 film by Tacita Dean about a rarely-sighted visual phenomenon – the last, slowest ray of the setting sun, which can be seen as a green line on the horizon under certain conditions. Similar to the powerful full moon in Moonstruck, people think of the green ray as “a harbinger of great change or fortune in their lives,” as Dean narrates for us, in her extremely crisp British accent.

This is a simple, and I think romantic film about faith and patience, the artist’s belief in celluloid film (this is a video version, sorry Tacita Dean!) and watching vigilantly to glimpse the unseen forces at work in the universe. Eric Rohmer’s 1986 film “Le Rayon Vert” also uses the green ray as a metaphor and plot point, tied in to a woman’s meandering and uncertain quest for romantic connection on her summer holidays. I recommend that film too – it stars Marie Rivière whose hair and world-weariness are French cognates to Cher’s in “Moonstruck.”