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Marvelous Movie Mondays: DAPS

EPFC | July 6th, 2018

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!

Guest Curator: Adán De La Garza

Theme: Cultural Geography and Performance for video
The videos selected for this series focus on performances for video outside of the studio or gallery that highlight both the agenda of the artist and the how the location they move through can influence or dictate that performance. Simple in their execution the artists remain open to the influence of their surroundings, at time relinquishing control entirely, albeit temporarily. The videos participate in a slow revealing of context and experimentation that rely heavily on one another to expose a myriad of things from the unique sounds of the space, cultural climate, human interaction, or even the infinite potential of a space given vast imagination.

Marvelous Movie Mondays: Eletrodoméstica

EPFC | June 26th, 2018

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
Guest Curator: Alexa Lim Haas
Theme: Imitations of The Everyday
In form, in method, in their naturalism.

What happens when nothing happens? We explore 4 films that resist the heroic and spectacular which are so foreign to our experience of the everyday. They are unconcerned with epic obstacles, bookends and grand conclusions. These films use documentary techniques to tell a fiction, blurring the lines of true and false and searching for the miraculous in the average. Often they involve non-actors and the means of production are minimal with filmmakers utilizing the resources available to them to imitate what they would consider an ordinary day. We shine light on the everyday because it is common ground for audiences to consider the effects of political and historical circumstance on the private lives of ordinary people.

This week a short by Brazilian filmmaker Kleber Mendonça Filho — a master of showcasing beauty in subtle human moments. The rhythm of this short is in tune with the sounds of domestic appliances — timers ticking, microwaves beeping, fans lulling. Watch until the end to see what our protagonist’s watch timer is counting down toward!

The simplicity of his synopsis says it all: “The middle class. Brazil in the 90s. At 220 volts.”

https://vimeo.com/10022944

 

The Road To Magnasanti

EPFC | May 22nd, 2018

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
guest curator: LJ Frezza

Just as all movies end, we will all end, and even this planet will end. What will come after is unknowable. But before all that, I’ll be posting videos that address progress, eschatology, and other terminal points.

This week, we’ll continue to explore the end, and in particular, the end of New York, with THE ROAD TO MAGNASANTI. Named for the most perfect game of Sim City ever played, in which all urban space was optimized for maximum population density, THE ROAD TO MAGNASANTI shows an old city is demolished to make room for luxury developments. Through a collage of wandering street-videography and a rambling yet insightful voice-over, director John Wilson explores hyper-gentrification, the police state, and the comedic absurdity of the city, questioning why the old New York has to end and just who this New New York is being built for.

THE ROAD TO MAGNASANTI (John Wilson, 2017)
https://vimeo.com/238073511

Marvelous Movie Mondays: Portrait of Turner

EPFC | April 30th, 2018

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
guest curator: Kiki Loveday

April showers bring QUEER REPRODUCTION.

A significant body of contemporary feminist work explores questions of adaptation, reiteration, and change through formal, temporal, and aesthetic means. Queer and feminist makers are re-writing the historical narrative while pushing the boundaries of multiple mediums. From Laleen Jayamanne’s A Song of Ceylon, Cecelia Condit’s Oh, Rapunzel, and Midi Onodera’s Ten Cents a Dance, to Elisabeth Subrin’s Shulie, Jennifer Montgomery’s Deliver, Amy Ruhl’s How Mata Hari Lost Her Head and Found Her Body, and Pauline Boudry/Renate Lorenz’s Salomania, to Ja’tovia Gary’s An Ecstatic Experience, Christina Corfield’s Petticoat Nation, Kate Lain’s friskies paté (for joyce wieland) and Irene Lusztig’s Yours in Sisterhood— these makers masterfully reiterate, reinscribe, and reimagine the past in order to transform the present. Every Monday this month I will post a video exploring this growing body of work that queerly questions the possibilities of re-production in the digital age.

Irene Gustafson’s 2009 55 minute video Portrait of Turner re-stages Shirley Clark’s challenging 1967 classic Portrait of Jason. In Gustafson’s experiment, her camera is turned upon performance artist Scott Turner Schofield, raising a series of questions about the nature of performance, experiment, and repetition. This obscure gem formally connects contemporary queer video practice to feminist film histories, insisting on comparison and re-vision that demands continued debate.

Enjoy!

https://vimeo.com/102774623

 

Marvelous Movie Mondays: QUEER REPRODUCTION

EPFC | April 18th, 2018

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
guest curator: Kiki Loveday

April showers bring QUEER REPRODUCTION.

A significant body of contemporary feminist work explores questions of adaptation, reiteration, and change through formal, temporal, and aesthetic means. Queer and feminist makers are re-writing the historical narrative while pushing the boundaries of multiple mediums. From Laleen Jayamanne’s A Song of Ceylon, Cecelia Condit’s Oh, Rapunzel, and Midi Onodera’s Ten Cents a Dance, to Elisabeth Subrin’s Shulie, Jennifer Montgomery’s Deliver, Amy Ruhl’s How Mata Hari Lost Her Head and Found Her Body, and Pauline Boudry/Renate Lorenz’s Salomania, to Ja’tovia Gary’s An Ecstatic Experience, Christina Corfield’s Petticoat Nation, Kate Lain’s friskies paté (for joyce wieland) and Irene Lusztig’s Yours in Sisterhood— these makers masterfully reiterate, reinscribe, and reimagine the past in order to transform the present. Every Monday this month I will post a video exploring this growing body of work that queerly questions the possibilities of re-production in the digital age.

Since her award-winning debut with How Mata Hari Lost Her Head and Found Her Body in 2011, Amy Ruhl has been developing an important body of work that returns persistently to feminist sites/cites in past popular cultures. Ruhl uses the phrase “radical reproduction” to describe this element of her oeuvre which includes a playful research-based practice and deep engagement with feminist film theory. Her ongoing multidisciplinary performance project, Between Tin Men, includes her trademark tropes of authorial self-inscription, mesmerizing visual effects, and feminist camp.
Enjoy!

https://vimeo.com/253139302