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Marvelous Movie Mondays: House

EPFC | May 14th, 2019

MORTALITY BLOOMS!
guest curator: Karen Azoulay

For the month of May, I will be posting a selection of films that are punctuated with floral and bomb imagery. Flowers can be used to remind us of vulnerability, mortality and the fleeting nature of time. This motif is paired with the brief and the sudden depiction of a bomb. A blooming mushroom cloud clearly evokes war, fear and death. Contextualizing the films within a specific historical moment and place, we cannot forget the political reality that each film was created in.

My second selection is ‘House’, 1977, directed by Nobuhiko Obayashi

“a modern masterpiece of le cinéma du WTF?!”
-Chuck Stephens, from his essay for The Criterion Collection

‘House’ is an extreme work of psychedelic horror. This experimental film follows seven teenage girls on a trip to visit one their aunts. Visually stunning, the gory depictions of dismemberment are more ridiculously surreal than scary. It’s not surprising to learn that Obayashi’s eleven year old daughter came up with most of the violent plot twists.

Although it is refreshing and rare for a movie to be almost entirely comprised of female actors, the one-dimensional characters are unfortunately sexualized in a realm of school girl exploitation.

On the train out of town, the main character regales her giggling pals with the backstory of her aunt. In a short flashback sequence, we see her narration come to life in the frames of black and white film strips. A tragic love story from the 40s, it suggests an ominous tone for the haunted home they are about to experience. This greyscale sequence is interrupted with two pops of red; a foreboding draft card, and a wilting, thorny rose that draws drips of blood. As with the rest of my selections this month, flower symbolism is paired with the explosion of a bomb. A Hiroshima native, the director lost most of his friends to the blast.

The clip below is an excerpt of this scene. I recommend tracking down the full feature for the demonic insanity that follows.

http://www.tcm.turner.com/…/Hausu-Movie-Clip-Over-The-Rainb…

#marvelousmoviemondays

Marvelous Movie Mondays Mortality Blooms

EPFC | May 6th, 2019

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
guest curator: Karen Azoulay

MORTALITY BLOOMS!

For the month of May, I will be posting a selection of films that are punctuated with floral and bomb imagery. Flowers can be used to remind us of vulnerability, mortality and the fleeting nature of time. This motif is paired with the brief and the sudden depiction of a bomb. A blooming mushroom cloud clearly evokes war, fear and death. Contextualizing the films within a specific historical moment and place, we cannot forget the political reality that each film was created in.

Aside from cinema, there are many cultural moments that depict our deep connections between flowers and war.

Inspired by the poem ‘In Flanders Fields’ by John McCrae, red poppies are a symbol of remembrance to the fallen soldiers of WWI.
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row…

The Flower Power movement used flowers to advocate for peace and love in protest to the Vietnam War. Two iconic photographs were taken in 1967 at the March on the Pentagon. Marc Riboud captured Jan Rose Kasmir as she offered a chrysanthemum to a member of the military police battalion while a bayonet is pointed towards her face. Bernie Boston captured George Edgerly Harris III (aka Hibiscus, cofounder of performance troupe The Cockettes) gently placing a carnation stem down the barrel of a rifle. In response to these events, Allen Ginsberg stated “Flower power meant more than just walking around with flowers in your hair. It really meant the power of Earth. The dissolving power of the pentagon was symbolized by that moment”

———

My first selection is ‘Peace, Little Girl’
credited to the DDB Agency and Tony Schwartz.

In 1964, only two years after the Cuban Missile Crisis, this television commercial ‘Peace, Little Girl’ used scare tactics to bolster Lyndon B. Johnson’s campaign in the Presidential election. In the age of Vietnam and the Cold War, his approach was inspired by his opponent’s aggressive attitudes regarding the military. Goldwater had previously expressed his willingness to use nuclear weapons if necessary. Stoking fear in order to manipulate voters may seem all too common place now, but this ad is considered to be one of the earliest and most controversial attack ads of all time.

It was only aired once as a paid spot on NBC. It was quickly pulled, which was perhaps a calculated move. Considered a scandal, it was continuously replayed and discussed on several news and talk shows which created a viral effect. The ad is considered to have had a big impact on L.B.J’s landslide victory.

In Western culture, daisies symbolize innocence and purity. Like a child, flowers can been viewed as fragile. Exploring the significance further, several associations come to mind. The phrase ‘pushing up daisies’ is a euphemism for ‘dead and buried’, alluding to wildflowers sprouting up from a burial mound. The act of plucking petals conjures the divination game “loves me, loves me not”, which is a solitary pursuit played in times of infatuation and uncertainty.

The single stem with no more petals to pull reminds us that time is running out…
KABOOM!
“Vote for President Johnson on November 3rd. The stakes are too high for you to stay home.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riDypP1KfOU

#marvelousmoviemondays

AUTOMATIC DOOM

EPFC | May 3rd, 2019

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
guest curator: Alex Johnston

The theme for this month: “SAYS WHO?”: MEDIA AND AUTHORITY
How does authority inhere in media? How is it maintained and how is it expressed? Who has the authority to define the past? Who has the authority to determine the future? Who has the authority to speak for whom? Who has the authority to lead? Who has the authority to bury the dead?

Says who?

For the final film in this series, we’ve got Emma Cooney’s hilarious yet melancholy AUTOMATIC DOOM. Inspired by a Sunday night family ritual, the film is a masterful supercut, drawing us in to the weird and world-weary mind of the legendary radio and television writer Andy Rooney. Compiling clips from “A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney,” the long-running (1978-2011) concluding segment of the weekly news magazine “60 Minutes,” AUTOMATIC DOOM subverts dominant paradigms of traditional televisual authority figures, celebrating Rooney as an intensely self-aware and humble authoritative voice. Deeply cynical yet deeply sincere, Rooney (and the film) offer the viewer a long curmudgeonly sigh, a humorous rumination on mortality, environmental catastrophe and the virtues and vices of sleep. AUTOMATIC DOOM is a profoundly humane work, showing us not that misery love company, but that company can provide much-needed relief from misery. Through Rooney’s open-hearted reflections on the terrifying miasma of precarity that shapes contemporary life, we feel a little bit less alone in the daily struggle just to muddle through, and to get a good night’s sleep.

Enjoy AUTOMATIC DOOM!

#marvelousmoviemondays

https://vimeo.com/332580083

THE VIOLENCE OF A CIVILIZATION WITHOUT SECRETS

EPFC | April 15th, 2019

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!�
guest curator: Alex Johnston

The theme for this month: “SAYS WHO?”: MEDIA AND AUTHORITY
How does authority inhere in media? How is it maintained and how is it expressed? Who has the authority to define the past? Who has the authority to determine the future? Who has the authority to speak for whom? Who has the authority to lead? Who has the authority to bury the dead?

Says who?

This week we’ve got the Khalil Brothers’ and Jackson Polys’ bold yet ruminative 2017 short, THE VIOLENCE OF A CIVILIZATION WITHOUT SECRETS. The film recounts the struggle of five Columbia Basin tribes to rebury the remains of one of their ancestors, known as “The Kennewick Man,” whose skeleton was discovered in 1996 along the banks of the Columbia River in the south eastern part of Washington state. Their demand was thwarted by a group of forensic anthropologists, who filed a lawsuit claiming that the cranial features of “The Kennewick Man” indicated that he was of European descent, and therefore not a tribal ancestor. (This lawsuit was gleefully endorsed by white supremacist groups, who claimed that the discovery proved their status as indigenous peoples.) The forensic anthropologists’ claim on “The Kennewick Man” for the purpose of “scientific study” was upheld by the courts, who asserted that the tribe’s oral histories constituted unreliable evidence. This decision was finally overturned in 2014, when advancements in DNA testing proved that “The Kennewick Man” was in fact an ancestor of the tribes, at which point he was reburied in a secret location.

In recounting this horrifying (and horrifyingly typical) incident, THE VIOLENCE OF A CIVILIZATION WITHOUT SECRETS offers a bracing meditation on the central role of enlightenment institutions and ideals–such as the museum, the archive, the courts and the scientific method–in enacting and maintaining hegemonic violence by the settler colonial state against indigenous peoples. The authority of these institutions to determine what constitutes valid forms of “evidence” and “knowledge,” is revealed to be a fundamental tool in maintaining control over every aspect of the lives, deaths, histories, and memories of subaltern peoples.

Enjoy THE VIOLENCE OF A CIVILIZATION WITHOUT SECRETS: https://vimeo.com/217342747

Marvelous Movie Mondays: Pattern For Survival

EPFC | April 8th, 2019

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!�
guest curator: Alex Johnston
The theme for this month: “SAYS WHO?”: MEDIA AND AUTHORITY

How does authority inhere in media? How is it maintained and how is it expressed? Who has the authority to define the past? Who has the authority to determine the future? Who has the authority to speak for whom? Who has the authority to lead? Who has the authority to bury the dead?

Says who?

This week we’ve got Kelly Sears “dreadfully” brilliant short film, PATTERN FOR SURVIVAL (2015), a spare yet dense interrogation of ideologies of “preparedness” in the face of perceived existential threats. How-to models (cut out from exercise manuals, emergency preparedness texts, hunting guidebooks, etc.) find themselves caught in desperate and compulsive loops of aggression, physical conditioning and disaster mitigation, as ominous slogans such as “Don’t pretend you have no fears,” “You can use bone as an effective weapon,” and “Security takes priority” appear below them on screen. These grotesque and revealing fragments of text, culled from a US Army Survival Manual, combine with the images to produce a kind of bizarro world survivalist handbook. In this way, Sears’ film compels us to question who and what it is we should actually be fearing.

Enjoy PATTERN FOR SURVIVAL!

https://vimeo.com/124163256