Satellite

REMINDER! LA AIR 2018 APPLICATIONS DUE 11.15.17!

EPFC | November 14th, 2017

LA AIR invites local artists to utilize EPFC resources in creating and premiering new, experimental, documentary, and personal work over a two-month period. Artists in residence also engage with the greater EPFC community via screenings, workshops and other events.

More info here!

 

THE SUBCONSCIOUS ART OF GRAFITTI REMOVAL

EPFC | November 14th, 2017

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
Guest curator: Andy Spletzer
Theme: Experimental Films are Funny

Some things (jokes, movies, etc.) are funny because they’re true. Such is the case with Matt McCormick’s THE SUBCONSCIOUS ART OF GRAFITTI REMOVAL (2001), a tongue-in-cheek tribute to art documentaries. The movie compares the squares of paint that city workers use to cover up graffiti to the work of modern artists like Rothko. Through Miranda July’s narration, McCormick posits that graffiti removal is a subconscious art, “a product of artistic merit that was created without conscious artistic intentions.” Not only that, but this is an important art movement. It’s a persuasive argument.

The reason the short documentary works so well is that its ultimate message is that art is everywhere, that human beings create subconscious art on a daily basis, and all you have to do is open your eyes to see it.

Matt McCormick is a Portland, Oregon-based filmmaker whose work has consistently balanced sincerity with a sense of humor. His latest feature-length documentary BUZZ ONE FOUR recently played this venue.

I encourage you to watch this doc and then check out his back catalog.

Experimental Films are Funny!

EPFC | November 7th, 2017

MARVELOUS MOVIE MONDAYS!!
Guest curator: Andy Spletzer

Like with any art form, there is a wide variety of experimental films out there. Some are poetic, some are abstract, some are absurdly narrative, some are subjective, some explore long-take realism, some are pretentious in a good way, and some are pretentious in a bad way. One reputation they rarely get is for humor. Unfairly.

My theme this month: Experimental Films are Funny!

I remember when I first learned about San Francisco filmmaker Robert Nelson. I was in college, the lights went down, and his short film “Bleu Shut” started unreeling. By the end I was giggling, trying to hold laughter to keep from infecting or being judged by my classmates. At the same time, my eyes were opened. This was funny and abstract and smart and stupid, all at the same time.

Made in 1970 or ’71, “Bleu Shut” claims to be 30 minutes, which is its first lie. At its heart, it’s a structuralist film. There’s a clock superimposed in the corner that marks the time, and every minute there’s a beep and a title card that tells you how many minutes have passed. There is also a narrator who tells you what to expect: The film has a boat game and entertainments (TRUE); at 11:15, a wiener (TRUE); at 21:05, pornography (TRUE). This format has the effect of making the film’s running time fly by because you know what to expect and how long you’re going to be watching.

Then there’s the boat game! That’s what has stuck with me through all these years. That’s what made me realize how funny experimental films can be. I hope you agree.

A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night

EPFC | November 1st, 2017

MARVELOUS “Who’s the Monster” MONDAYS!!
guest curator: Amy Khoshbin

It’s Halloween-eve and the final week of my curatorial exploration of Hollywood’s portrayal of Middle Easterners as the terrorist/monster. This week I’m flipping the script to include an Iranian-American-made horror film I love: A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night by Ana Lily Amirpour. A Vampire Western, this film portrays a chador-wearing, skateboarding vampire that is also a feminist hero- surviving on the blood of misogynists and manipulators that everyone watching wants dead. With a mostly Iranian-American cast speaking in Farsi and shot in CA, this film speaks to the outsiderness of being an immigrant. The visuals are Jarmuschian, the pacing is on-point, and the main character, while technically a monster, is actually relatable. A lot of you may have seen this one already, but if not, it’s worth a hallowatch.

big thanks to Echo Park Film Center for having me for the month of Oct- keep up with my work at tinyscissors.com !!

A Day In The Sun at Union Cinema Milwaukee

EPFC | October 12th, 2017

A DAY IN THE SUN: NEW WORKS FROM THE ECHO PARK FILM CENTER

TONIGHT! Thursday, October 12 at 7 PM – FREE!

UWM Union Cinema

2200 E Kenwood Blvd, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211

Experimental Tuesdays at the Union Cinema is a free series unspooling on most Tuesdays (and in this case a Thursday!) throughout the semester that shares contemporary and canonical experimental media. Presented by the UWM Union Cinema and the UWM Department of Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.

Free and open to all!

 
In recognition of their countless hours as the Center’s educators, programmers, projectionists and facilitators, Echo Park Film Center Co-op members were commissioned to make new experimental lens-based works exploring their relationships to Los Angeles. Coming from all walks of life, Co-op members include both experienced and self-taught filmmakers, queer identifying filmmakers, artists of color, art school graduates, and EPFC youth film program alumni.

++++++++
Program:

Quantum Identity Politics // Miko Revereza // Video // 10 min.
To be an undocumented immigrant in America is a performance. I am now exhausted of this performance. As long as documentation is used to exclude, deport, and incarcerate people by race and class lines, then our role as artists and thinkers is to decode, reconfigure, and subvert documents as conceptual play objects.

The Burning of Los Angeles // Cosmo Segurson // 16mm transferred to video // 4 min.
An interpretation of a painting described in Nathaniel West’s “The Day of the Locust” from 1939.

From Brooklyn to Broadway // Brenda Contreras // Video // 7 min.
The untold collection of short, bizarre narratives.

Angelus Novus // Gina Marie Napolitan // 16mm loop with 35 mm slides transferred to video // 6 min.
A hopscotch through our historical, geographical, and cultured memory. Los Angeles as a place of wilderness up-ended by human settlement, and subsequently, a place of human settlement up-ended by nature time and again. “This storm is what we call progress.”

A Beautiful Tragedy // Sharmaine Starks // Video // 15 min.
Inspired by the numerous candle light vigils that fill the alleys, parking lots and street corners of Compton, Watts and South Central LA.

Palimpsest // Penelope Uribe-Abee // Super 8 transferred to video // 3 min.
A look into the spiritual and phantasmic effects that gentrification has an identity, self and the landscapes that these ontological frameworks spring from.

Beauties // Lisa Marr // Super 8 transferred to video // 10 min.
A cinematic mash note to the Mack Sennett Bathing Girls.

Worlds Below, Or: Los Angeles Breaks Its Mother’s Back // Emett Casey // 16mm // 7 min.
A rhythmic study of cracks in Los Angeles sidewalks, and their relationship to free root structures.

Avanti Popolo (People Move Forward) // Paolo Davanzo // 16mm Dual Projection // 3 min.
A journey through the city on my bicycle shot on 16mm film and hand-processed. A look at the rapid changes happening in Los Angeles and a hope to reclaim the fragments of community life that are being taken away from us.

Filmmakers and EPFC Coop members Paolo Davanzo and Lisa Marr in attendance!


+++++++++

This program has been made possible by a grant from the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts.

Launched in June of last year, the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts Artist Project Grants seek to further Mike Kelley’s philanthropic work and honor his legacy by supporting innovative projects with visual artists at L.A. nonprofit institutions and organizations. The goal is to benefit both visual artists and arts organizations alike and to support compelling and inventive projects in any medium, particularly work that is under-known, or has proven difficult to make or to fund.

+++++++++