Marvelous Movie Mondays: Libyan Attack

EPFC | October 4th, 2017

guest curator: Amy Khoshbin

Living as an Iranian-American artist in the US when there is a ban on Iranians coming here freely keeps me motivated to act. And it keeps me looking at our culture and at our media critically, as tiring as it can get.

I had already planned on launching this series of Who’s The Monster Movie Mondays: scenes in popular US films that portray the Middle Easterner as enemy- starting off with Back to the Future. And this morning, I was so sad to read that the worst massacre in modern American history happened in Las Vegas. All news outlets describe the shooter as a “lone wolf” and not connected to terrorism. He is the definition of a terrorist even though he’s white. White shooters are responsible for most acts of domestic terrorism.

Let’s start looking at how the media plays a huge role in why we only define Middle Easterners as “terrorists.” And let’s begin our series with the old classic, Back to the Future.

Remember when Doc gets gunned down by Libyan terrorists and Marty is unpreparedly sent back to 1955 to escape? When I was a kid in 1985, I didn’t fully understand the context of the Libyan terrorist subplot. Libya was one of the poorest countries and suddenly started making money when they found oil in 1959. The US got really interested in the region and staffed their bases up. In 1969 Gaddafi removed the US oil companies by nationalizing the Libyan oil industry so they could make money off of their own resource. The US then deemed the Libyans a “state sponsor of terrorism” in 1979. Libya and the US started fighting and then in 1982 there were economic sanctions imposed against Libya, which were ramped up in 1986.

My question is, did Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale write in the Libyan enemies because of their own feelings or were their feelings based on the media’s fearmongering of Libyans to perpetuate military actions against a country whose oil we wanted? Sounds familiar…


EPFC | September 30th, 2017

LA AIR invites local artists to utilize EPFC resources in creating and premiering new, experimental, documentary, and personal work over a two-month period. We especially encourage applications from artists interested in engaging with EPFC’s areas of specialty: small gauge film, progressive politics & community activism, alternative and handmade photochemical processes, local histories, multidisciplinary work, and expanded cinema. Additionally, we encourage artists to engage with the greater EPFC community during the course of their residency. Previous artists-in-residence have included public workshops, curatorial programs, multi-media collaborations and class visits as part of their residency.

This year’s deadline for applications is Wednesday, November 15 at 5 pm.

More info here!

Marvelous Movie Mondays: Eaton Canyon

EPFC | September 25th, 2017

Marvelous Movie Mondays! It’s our final week to celebrate A Day In The Sun: Films by the EPFC Coop and we’re giving a super special shout out to the fabulous Ms. Kate Lain, charter Coop member and the creator/curator/champion of Marvelous Movie Mondays! Thanks for all you do, Kate, in bringing the global experimental community together here each week!

Let’s enjoy a nature break with Kate’s film Eaton Canyon (1.2 miles in 50 feet).

Traces of what has come before imbue the present. In Eaton Canyon, one of the most trafficked hiking destinations near Los Angeles, you can find a multitude of traces of its own making—traces of geologic change, of jurisdictional decisions, of plant and animal life, of constructions built to last but now left as ruins. This suite of works is imbued with traces not only of a particular moment in this canyon, but also of their own making.

Born and raised in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains, Kate works in a variety of media including digital video, super 8 film, photography, paper, clay, and fabric. She is interested in intersections—of human and nature, myth and lived experience, feminine and masculine. Her video and film work verges on documentary and spans a wide range—from essay film to stop-motion collage to impressionist portrait. She has an MFA in Science & Natural History Filmmaking, and her works have screened at festivals and venues internationally.

Hour of Pearl

EPFC | September 18th, 2017

Marvelous Movie Mondays! This month we’re celebrating A Day In The Sun: New Films by the EPFC Coop and today we invite you to enjoy Hour of Pear by Andrew Kim, EPFC’s AWESOME General Operations Manager.

“In Cannery Row, John Steinbeck refers to the Monterey dawn as the hour of pearl or “the interval between day and night when time stops and examines itself.” Transposed to a community of fishermen at the Ventura Pier in 2017, these words offer a new kind of insight.”


EPFC | September 12th, 2017

What is the coziest, kookiest, coolest small-gauge film festival in the world? It’s the 8 fest!

“The 8fest is a festival for anyone using small-gauge to create rough little gems on film. A unique Toronto-based film festival that presents all forms of small-gauge film: 8mm, Super 8 and 9.5mm, as well as works in installation, loops, personal, handmade, experimental, animations, diaries, essays, collage, cut-ups, performance/film, music/film and ‘proto-cinema devices’ like zoetropes.”

You too can be part of the magic… submissions are due September 30 for the 2018 festival, happening in Toronto on January 25 – 28. More info here!